A recent survey from Direct Line showed that one in four landlords report not being able to keep up with changing regulations. Therefore, it may be a bit of a shock to many landlords to hear that from 2025, all newly rented properties will require an energy performance certificate rating of C or above, with this deadline extended to 2028 for existing tenancies (please note these dates are subject to change).

Failure to comply will lead to a property becoming unrentable.

Making changes to improve a property’s energy efficiency rating will help to improve the overall energy efficiency of the UK housing stock and to assist the government in meeting the ambitious net-carbon zero targets set out earlier this year.

But on a more direct level, making the improvements ahead of the impending 2025 deadline will ensure that properties remain commercially viable for the short and long term for landlords. Putting off making necessary changes could leave landlords exposed to extended void periods when their property can’t be rented out while works are being completed.

What can be done to improve the EPC rating?

If you’re a landlord, you’ll need to prepare, especially if your rating is at E to G. You can start by making sure that you have done the following to improve your EPC rating.

1. Improve your lighting to LED light bulbs.

2. Insulate the walls and roof.

3. Improve windows with double or triple glazing.

4. Install an energy-efficient boiler.

5. Use a smart meter.

Generally, investing in renewable energy will help to improve your EPC of your rental property, especially using products such as solar panels and ground-source heat pumps.

But beware – analysis from Habito published late 2021 found the average cost of upgrading a property from just an EPC ‘D’ rating to ‘C’ is £6,155.  A cost that, at the moment, the landlord needs to burden. So it is inevitable that more than half (52%) of landlords with properties with an Energy Performance Certificate of D or below are considering selling due to the rules requiring them to improve their rating, according to research from The Mortgage Works (TMW).

Eco-friendly properties could also lower your mortgage costs

A growing number of banks and building societies will offer landlords a lower interest rate if their home is more energy-efficient.

Green mortgages may offer lower interest rates, as they are viewed as more valuable to prospective buyers and renters who would benefit from lower energy bills. But you will usually need an EPC rating of A or B to qualify for a green mortgage.

If you’re looking for an eco-property to let out or are carrying out work to improve a property, reviewing green mortgages could help you get more out of your investment.

Please contact us to discuss your mortgage needs.

Please note: This blog is for general information only and does not constitute advice. The information is aimed at retail clients only.

Some buy-to-let mortgages are not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

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